Tag Archives: chicken

Turkish Yogurt Soup

1 Jul

I recently bought an EasiYo yogurt maker after getting tired of the dilemma of trying to decipher which store-bought yogurt labeled “plain” was actually plain, which was vanilla-flavored, and which contained more sugar than a can of soda–believe me, you only want to accidentally put sweet vanilla yogurt on your falafel once to lose all taste for ever making that mistake again.  Anyway, I made a batch of unsweetened Greek yogurt, was quite pleased with the fresh and tangy results, and then faced the problem of what to do with a liter of yogurt before it spoils.  Even I can’t drink that much lassi that quickly.

Yogurt soup was the answer–and it also let me play with the mint I’ve been trying to grow indoors!  I started out with a recipe from The New Mediterranean Diet Cookbook, tweaking as I went along (as usual).  Since this is not reheat-friendly soup, I didn’t want to wind up with oodles of leftovers I’d have to nurse carefully along over a burner to prevent curdling, so I had to cut some of the measurements in thirds.  I also didn’t add any rice or grain, to avoid excess carbs.

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Dalkkalbi

25 May

A uniquely Korean food that I’m always a little surprised hasn’t caught on more, internationally, is 닭갈비 (dalk-kalbi).  In Seoul, dalkkalbi restaurants are everywhere. dalkkalbi001
You come in as a group, sit down around a table with a built-in hotplate, and the server brings your chicken to cook in front of you while you wait.  At heart, it’s just spicy chicken stir-fry.  External trappings may include 떡 (ddeok, or rice cake), potato, sweet potato, an assortment of vegetables, mushrooms, glass noodles, shredded cheese, or even a round of fried rice at the end.  Either way, I’ve never met a foreigner who tried it and didn’t like it.

I’ve been telling myself I was going to whip up a batch at home for months, now, but between the move, training for a new job, and general new-home issues, I didn’t find time until today.  I used an excellent recipe, which I really didn’t stray too far from.  The curry powder was kind of a surprise addition, but I tried it and it really works. Anyway, I’m exceptionally pleased with how this batch came out.  Now I’ve just got to figure out what to do with all the leftovers!

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Chinese Cola Chicken

11 Feb

chinesecolachicken001So there I was, reading the student newspaper with my class, when an article on weird foods popped up. One of the foods mentioned therein happened to be Pepsi-chicken flavored potato chips, which are apparently a thing in China. Which is apparently because cola chicken is a popular dish, in some parts of China. Pepsi chicken.  It didn’t sound like a very intuitive combination, but the more I thought about it, the more I actually wanted to try it. I mean, I’d heard of using cola in barbecue sauce, and I’d heard of using it to marinate/tenderize meat. Why not?

So I did.

This was admittedly a complete and utter experiment, based tenuously off of this recipe, and there are a number of things I would do differently if I made it a second time. For instance, googling the appropriate handling of cardamom pods before putting them into a dish, not after. All in all, though, I think it turned out pretty good. It’s sweet, a bit spicy, and has a definite gingery kick. It would be great over a little steamed rice.

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Drunken Dog-days Chicken

22 Aug

In Korea, there’s a dish that’s traditionally eaten during the three hottest “dog days” of summer.  It’s called samgyetang (삼계탕), which translates literally to ‘ginseng chicken soup’.  Lots of people swear by it, and I’ve eaten it and cooked it a few times, but never was quite sold on the taste.  However, when I found a recipe for a delicious garlic chicken stove-top dish (from SmittenKitchen), looked at the miserable, hot, rainy weather outside my window, and thought about it for a moment, I knew exactly what I wanted to do.

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Salad with an Attitude

16 Aug

Most people seem to get into the habit of thinking of salad as an afterthought, some vaguely nutritious green filler to cover a bare patch of plate.  I hate that kind of salad.  You know, the three limp pieces of romaine or iceberg smeared with some sort of dressing and a few slivers of carrot that you find awkwardly arranged in a bowl before you can get to the real food.  Forget that stuff.  This is a meal in itself. It eliminates sugars and processed carbs, but remains brimming with flavor, color, and texture. And with no meal-break at my job, it’s got to tide me over until I get home for dinner.

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